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Case studies and interviews are aligned with clinical specialties and high risk areas identified in the Harvard system.

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Primary Care Docs Try to Up Their Diagnosis Game
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

The idea of missing something, or finding out that follow up on a lab order or specialty consult fell through the cracks, can haunt providers. Nothing represents these concerns better than a claim from a patient or family that you failed to diagnose their cancer. A recent review of professional liability claims from across the United States shows that diagnosis-related claims account for a higher percentage of dollar costs than any other category.

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Part III: Harvard Joins IHI to Cut Referral Mistakes
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

According to estimates, as many as half of medical specialty referrals are not fully completed. In a study of medical malpractice cases asserted in the Harvard system between 2006 and 2015, 46 cases involved referral breakdowns, with an incurred cost of $11 million. The vast majority involved severe harm to the patient. Closing the Loop... is a guide to prevent this from continuing.

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Patient Safety Becoming a Family Affair
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

Experts: the need to pull families onto the patient safety team will only grow with ongoing trends of shorter hospital stays, and care moving into ambulatory sites and even into the patient’s home. Family caregivers will be a big part of safety at each stage.

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Part II: Harvard Joins IHI to Cut Referral Mistakes
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

Mishandled specialty referrals in ambulatory care can harm patients and lead to litigation if a diagnosis is delayed or missed. Two leading groups hope individual practices and institutions will use the Guide to make their referrals more reliable and reduce mistakes.

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Part I: Harvard Joins IHI to Cut Referral Mistakes
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

In any complex medical system, malpractice cases can arise from failures in the referral process. Typically these are situations in ambulatory care where the doctor recommends that a patient see a specialist, but it either doesn’t happen or nobody acts on the result. A new tool from The Institute for Healthcare Improvement and CRICO helps guide doctors and practices to prevent these referral errors and the harm from resulting diagnostic failures.

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Malpractice Cases Involving Non-Adherent Patients
By Jock Hoffman, CRICO

Make an effort to find out why your patient ignores your advice.

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Insight: Best Practices in Referral Communication
By Jennie Wright, RN, CRICO

Processes to promote ongoing communication between referring physicians and specialists are essential to providing high quality and safe patient care. To date, maintenance efforts have tended to be provider-specific rather than process based.

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Covering our Volunteers
By Hermen Yee, Esq, and Caren-Elise Titus, CRICO

If you are a member of the Harvard medical community who has registered with the MA Responds program to volunteer in a declared public health emergency, you may have wondered if you are covered by your CRICO professional liability policies. The good news is that generally you are covered! The only caveat is that some of you need to obtain certain written authorizations from your sponsoring institution.

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Harvard Primary Care Sites Collaborate on Innovations in Patient Safety, Quality
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

For two years, The HMS Center for Primary Care partnered with CRICO, to “move the needle” in four areas of ambulatory care. A key success factor: funding so personnel from the 28 practices could meet off-site to collaborate with each other. Watch participants share how this project transformed their practices, and continues to fuel collaboration to prevent medical harm and promote care improvements.grant_icon

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