Jonathan Einbinder, MD, is Vice President for Advanced Data Analytics and Coding for the Patient Safety Department. The analytics and coding team are responsible for the clinical data analytic and coding needs of CRICO, including Patient Safety and Candello.

Prior to joining CRICO, Dr. Einbinder served as Corporate Manager for Quality Data Management at Partners Healthcare System. He is also an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an attending physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Dr. Einbinder’s academic and management interests are in data warehousing in healthcare, particularly in support of research, education, and quality improvement, use of Informatics to enhance undergraduate and graduate medical education, and understanding the role of people and organizational issues with regard to the success/failure of healthcare information technology. His prior roles include Director of Clinical Data Repository Project and Data Administration at the University of Virginia Health System.

He received a BA from Columbia University, an MD from Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons in New York, and an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Jonathan Einbinder

Jonathan’s Content

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    Malpractice Data Tell a Story… So Do the People Who Use Them

    Podcast
    Each year, thousands of misdiagnosed cancers, technical errors in surgery, and other harm events are added to a national database of medical malpractice claims, and a benchmarking report is released to the public. This year, instead of only describing the significance of the trends and numbers, the sponsoring organization from the Harvard system, Candello, is releasing a report that describes real stories of tangible change arising from those numbers.
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    Woman’s Stroke Progressed in ED without Intervention

    Podcast
    The patient needed to be evaluated by a stroke team and a neurologist promptly to decide whether any treatment was indicated or possible. Triage should be the same whether the ER was empty or overcapacity.
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