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March 1, 2022 Frequency and Nature of Communication and Handoff Failures in Medical Malpractice Claims

Using Candello data, this study examines the characteristics of malpractice claims which miscommunications.

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March 1, 2022 Improving Patient Handoffs Helps Reduce Malpractice Claims

Healthcare Risk Management reports on a large study conducted by Boston Children’s Hospital in which researchers reviewed 498 medical malpractice claims provided by Candello, CRICO’s national medical malpractice collaborative. The work revealed a direct relationship between the quality of patient handoffs and claims.

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January 5, 2022 To Measure and Reduce Diagnostic Error, Start With the Data You Have

This article, published by the Michigan State Medical Society, provides insight into how CRICO's diagnostic process of care framework, using medical malpractice claims data, can be used to reduce diagnostic errors.

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OR Safety Series: Insights From University of Michigan School of Nursing

  • October 8, 2020

How to prevent retained surgical item incidents was the subject of a webinar, hosted by Becker's Hospital Review. CRICO data was quoted.


“Leaving behind surgical sponges can have a life-altering effect on patients and leave a permanent scar on a hospital’s quality and safety reputation,” reported Becker's Hospital Review. The webinar provided some key takeaways which included data from CRICO’s database. 

In addition to unexpected health complications, retained surgical sponges (RSS) can also lead to financial complications, reported one of the speakers. Valerie Marsh shared: “Patients received an average of $600,000 after an RSS, and hospitals had to cover, on average, $77,512 in additional costs for treating and performing surgeries to remove the retained sponge without reimbursement, according to the Risk Management Foundation of Harvard Medical Institutions.” 

 

Citation for the Full-text Article

Oliver E. OR safety series: Insights from University of Michigan School of NursingBecker’s Clinical Leadership & Infection Control. October 8, 2020.

 

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