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< Back To Patient Safety

Starting Points for Patient Safety
By Jock Hoffman, CRICO

Patient Safety: Benchmark before improving. Learn how.

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Clinician Burnout, Patient Safety Research, & more...
By Alison Anderson, CRICO, Missy Padoll, CRICO, Wallinda Hutson, CRICO

Insights September 2016: Clinician burnout, patient safety research, disclosure guidelines, and more...

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A Patient Safety Survey Course
By Jock Hoffman, CRICO

What do you want to learn more about?

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MedMal Claim FAQs, Physician Health, and more...
By Alison Anderson, CRICO, Missy Padoll, CRICO, Wallinda Hutson, CRICO

Insights August 2016: MedMal Claim FAQs, Physician Health, and more...

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Who’s Who in Health Care?
By Jock Hoffman, CRICO

It’s not always clear who does what.

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National MedMal Huddle Looks at Communication Errors/Solutions
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

Nearly 3 in 10 medical malpractice cases have identifiable problems with communication, according to a report by CRICO, the malpractice insurer for the Harvard medical institutions. Proven solutions highlighted a national gathering of patient safety leaders in Boston.

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Residents, OR Teamwork, Empathy, and more...
By Alison Anderson, CRICO, Missy Padoll, CRICO

Insights July 2016: Residents, OR Teamwork, Empathy, and more...

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What’s It Like to Be Sued?
By Tom A. Augello, CRICO

One physician said that when you’re being sued for medical malpractice, “you want a whole army behind you.” The second physician advised the need to “fly in formation” with the insurance representatives, defense attorney, and supportive colleagues. A third remarked that the experience left him less trusting of patients. The fourth physician said it hasn’t changed how he interacts with patients “one whit.”

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Standards for Residents Same as Senior Physicians
By Frank Reardon, JD, John J. Barton, JD

A number of important legal rulings have held that attendings are not responsible for the acts of other health care professionals. But they must assign tasks appropriate to the individual's range of capabilities and provide adequate supervision. Where a resident is permitted to perform a procedure or oversee a course of treatment, these cases show that the patient and the courts will expect that the resident is at a level of training and experience to adequately do so.

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Improving the Surgical Residents ED Experience
By John Schuler, MD

Surgical residents in the ED need opportunities to develop their ability for inductive logic and to improve their clinical sense through repeated exposure to undifferentiated, ill patients. With this experience, the surgical trainee sees a variety of clinical problems and patients, learns to think critically while under stress, practices his or her skills, learns from mistakes, and ultimately develops confidence in his or her decision-making and clinical judgment.

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21-30 of (301) items Page of 31